Creating Your Own Required Reading List

I really enjoyed your post! I absolutely loved reading your rebuttal and almost felt like I was sitting with you out in the garage smoking a cigar. Not to be too sappy, but I felt like I was back home when I read it.

Anyway, that’s not the point of this post. What I really want to do is keep building on this argument. I agreed with everything you said. You should never force yourself to read a book you don’t enjoy just because society said you should. That’s not the point of reading, the point of reading is gaining new knowledge, new perspective, and new ideas.

When I say that there are books out there that you need to read, I’m definitely not saying that you have to read them. You’re not in high school anymore so there’s no weekly reading assignment or list of class books you have to slog your way through. You have the right to choose what you read and don’t read. When I say that there are books you need to read, what I mean is that sometimes there are books you’re not that eager to read, but you really should to reach your goals.

Going back to the food analogy, there are plenty of foods out there that are pretty much unanimously voted to be “good” for us, like cauliflower. On the other hand, there are foods out there that are “bad” for us, like cookies. However, who gets to decide what it means to be good and bad?  When it comes to food, it’s mostly based on nutritional value, but I would argue it should also be based on what you need as an individual.

Cauliflower is a bad food if you’re prepping for a run, it just doesn’t have the carbs you’d need. Cookies are a good food if you’ve had a shitty day and need a pick me. It’s all based on what you need.

Sue

What I gained from The Dresden Files was the image of a wizard riding an undead T-rex. Who could argue with the value of that?

I think this is also true for books. There are plenty of books that English teachers across the country think I should read, like Catcher in the Rye, but I don’t feel like I need to read them because I’m not going to gain anything from them. To be honest, I feel like I’ve gained more from The Dresden Files than I ever would from those books, and you’d be hard pressed to find an English teacher that would assign the tales of Harry Dresden in class.


When it comes to reading, I feel like more people should view it as a tool to grow. I’m not saying there’s anything wrong with reading just for pleasure. There’s definitely value in reading a book to relax and I’ve read my fair share of pointless books just because the cover was interesting. What I’m saying is that you should never stray away from reading a book because it’s a challenge, stray away from a book because you don’t want to read it or find no value in it instead.

And, of course, whether something has value is based on what you need, not what some authority figure told you. I decided to read Dante’s Inferno, The Lord of the Rings, The Grapes of Wrath, and The Jungle because I personally decided that I wanted more knowledge on those subjects, not because I found them on some “100 Books You Need to Read to Be Smart” list.

When I say reading for sustenance, what I really mean is that you should figure out what books will sustain who you want to be. Never, ever read a book just because someone told you to.

-EMS

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